SITE MAP | CONTACT US

 

 

 

HOME | ALL ABOUT BIOFILMS | OUR RESEARCH | PUBLICATIONS | POSTERS | ABOUT US

 
  YOU ARE HERE : HOME > OUR RESEARCH > RESULTS AND DATA > CILIATE DIVERSITY  
 

 

Home

All about biofilms

Our research

Publications

Posters

About us

...............................................

 

 

   

 

Ciliate diversity in streams

Ciliate diversity was investigated in biofilm samples collected during May 2006 from each stream. Ciliate 18S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified from DNA extracted from each stream, using ciliate-targeted PCR primers. The resulting PCR products were identified by cloning, sequencing and comparing them with DNA sequences in GenBank. Sequences differing by over 97 % were considered to represent different taxa.

  • A total of 240 cloned sequences were identified from the four streams. Of these, 176 (73 %) were determined to be of probable ciliate origin. These 176 putative ciliate sequences contained 54 different taxa, from seven ciliate classes. Sequences matching organisms from class Oligohymenophorea were most common, followed by Phyllopharyngea, Spirotrichea, Colpodea, and Litostomatea. Sequences matching organisms from the classes Prostomatea and Nassophorea were less common. Four ciliate classes were not detected in our study.


Ciliate diversity in Auckland stream biofilms
(click on picture to see the chart in full size
)

  • The range of ciliate sequences detected in the different streams showed little overlap, with only four of the 54 different sequences detected in more than one stream. The number of probable ciliate taxa detected ranged from 11 in the least impacted stream to 18 in the slightly impacted stream, with 15 in the moderately impacted and highly impacted streams.
  • In terms of species, Zoothamnium (Oligohymenophorea) was the most common sequence in Cascade Stream (low impact). Platyophrya (Colpodea) and Dysteria (Phyllopharyngea) were the most common ciliate sequences in the slightly impacted stream, and Vorticella (Oligohymenophorea) was the most common sequence in the moderately impacted stream. Mesanophrys and Entorhipidium (both Oligohymenophorea) were the most common ciliate sequences in the highly impacted stream. Sequences from sessile peritrichs (Epistylis, Vorticella, and Zoothamnium) were common in all three stony-bottom streams, but were not detected in channelized, higly impacted stream. Conversely, sequences from predatory taxa such as Litonotus and Loxophyllum were detected in the most impacted stream, but not elsewhere.


Table of ciliates detected in Auckland stream biofilms
(click on picture to see the table in full size)

 

   

 

Newsletter

...............................................

Contact us

Stream Biofilm Research Group
School of Biological Sciences
The University of Auckland
3a Symonds Street
Auckland, New Zealand
-----
streambiofilmgmail.com

...............................................

About us

...............................................

Links

...............................................

 

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

© Stream Biofilm Project, The University of Auckland 2008-2010
...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................